A plane splits the euclidean space in two by all the points that satisfy the plane equation ax + by + cz + d = 0. As can be seen this is an extension of the concept of lines in 2 dimensions though lines can also exist in three dimensions.

plane(...)

is_plane(x)

as_plane(x)

Arguments

...

Various input. See the Constructor section.

x

A vector of planes or an object to convert to it

Value

An euclid_plane vector

Constructors

3 dimensional planes

  • Providing 4 numberics will construct planes with coefficients from the 4 numerics in the order given.

  • Providing 3 points will construct planes passing through the three points

  • Providing a point and vector will construct planes that goes through the point and are orthogonal to the vector

  • Providing a point and a direction will construct planes that goes through the point and are orthogonal to the direction

  • Providing a point and a line will construct planes that goes through the point and 2 points on the line

  • Providing a point and a ray will construct planes that goes through the point and 2 points on the ray

  • Providing a point and a segment will construct planes that goes through the point and the two points making up the segment

  • Providing a circle will construct planes that contains the circle

  • Providing a triangle will construct planes that contains the triangle

Examples

# Construction p <- plane(sample(10, 2), sample(10, 2), sample(10, 2), sample(10, 2)) p
#> <3D euclid_planes [2]> #> [1] <a:1, b:9, c:5, d:7> <a:8, b:7, c:2, d:10>